CHOPZZ Website Hit Counter

Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley

(Source: reznikz)

  1. Camera: Canon PowerShot SD870 IS
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/500th
  4. Focal Length: 28mm
"Don’t try to behave as though you were essentially sane and naturally good. We’re all demented sinners in the same cosmic boat — and the boat is perpetually sinking."
— Aldous Huxley, “Island,” born on this day in 1894. (via sharpedlamb)

(Source: elucipher)

anukkinearthwalker:

They were both critically acclaimed writers who were ahead of their time, creating imaginative visions of the future in their novels.

But an enlightening letter sent by Aldous Huxley to his fellow author George Orwell more than 60 years ago reveals that the two men had very different ideas of how the world would change.

Huxley’s 1949 letter - the latest addition to a website that collectsfascinating missives from the past - praises Orwell for the novel 1984, which offers a terrifying portrayal of a future totalitarian society.

ca. 1940s --- George Orwell, famous English author. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS
Aldous Huxley.....AUTHORS - NOVEMBER 1934 Died November 1963 . REXMAILPIX.

Worlds apart: The novel 1984 by George Orwell, left, predicted a different world to that envisaged by Aldous Huxley, right

But the late California-based author - who had coincidentally taught Orwell more than three decades earlier - went on to focus on the differences between Orwell’s vision and that revealed in his own masterpiece.


But Orwell’s novel presented a nightmarish vision and gave birth to the phrases ‘Big Brother’, ‘thought crime’ and ‘double think’, all now commonly used to describe increasing state control. 
His novel Brave New World, published 17 years before Orwell’s, had foreseen a society characterised by medicated contentment, a widely accepted, eugenics-supported caste system, and a government-enforced obsession with consumerism.

The book was later made into a film starring John Hurt, Richard Burton and Suzanna Hamilton.

In the letter Huxley began by echoing the positive reviews for 1984, telling Orwell ‘how fine and how profoundly important the book is’.

Going on to focus on the differences between their predictions, however, Huxley wrote: ‘The philosophy of the ruling minority in Nineteen Eighty-Four is a sadism which has been carried to its logical conclusion by going beyond sex and denying it.

Book: 1984 by George Orwell
Front cover of the book Brave New World by Aldous Huxley.

Different visions? The covers of these editions of Orwell’s 1984, left, and Huxley’s Brave New World, use similar imagery

‘Whether in actual fact the policy of the boot-on-the-face can go on indefinitely seems doubtful.

‘My own belief is that the ruling oligarchy will find less arduous and wasteful ways of governing and of satisfying its lust for power, and these ways will resemble those which I described in Brave New World.’ 

The letter was written at Huxley’s California home in October 1949, a few months after the release of Orwell’s book.

Adaptation: Orwell's novel was adapted for a film starring John Hurt and Richard Burton

Adaptation: Orwell’s novel was adapted for a film starring John Hurt and Richard Burton

It has been added to the website Letters of Note, which gathers and posts fascinating letters, postcards, telegrams, faxes, and memos.

The relationship between the two authors began in 1917, while Huxley was a tutor at Eton and Orwell was a pupil. Huxley taught French.

Huxley’s other students at Eton included the writer and scholar, Harold Acton.

ALDOUS HUXLEY’S LETTER IN FULL…

Wrightwood. California.
21 October, 1949

Dear Mr. Orwell,

It was very kind of you to tell your publishers to send me a copy of your book.

It arrived as I was in the midst of a piece of work that required much reading and consulting of references; and since poor sight makes it necessary for me to ration my reading, I had to wait a long time before being able to embark on Nineteen Eighty-Four.

Agreeing with all that the critics have written of it, I need not tell you, yet once more, how fine and how profoundly important the book is.

May I speak instead of the thing with which the book deals — the ultimate revolution?

The first hints of a philosophy of the ultimate revolution — the revolution which lies beyond politics and economics, and which aims at total subversion of the individual’s psychology and physiology — are to be found in the Marquis de Sade, who regarded himself as the continuator, the consummator, of Robespierre and Babeuf.

The philosophy of the ruling minority in Nineteen Eighty-Four is a sadism which has been carried to its logical conclusion by going beyond sex and denying it.

Whether in actual fact the policy of the boot-on-the-face can go on indefinitely seems doubtful.

My own belief is that the ruling oligarchy will find less arduous and wasteful ways of governing and of satisfying its lust for power, and these ways will resemble those which I described in Brave New World.

I have had occasion recently to look into the history of animal magnetism and hypnotism, and have been greatly struck by the way in which, for a hundred and fifty years, the world has refused to take serious cognizance of the discoveries of Mesmer, Braid, Esdaile, and the rest.

Partly because of the prevailing materialism and partly because of prevailing respectability, nineteenth-century philosophers
and men of science were not willing to investigate the odder facts of psychology for practical men, such as politicians, soldiers and policemen, to apply in the field of government.

Thanks to the voluntary ignorance of our fathers, the advent of the ultimate revolution was delayed for five or six generations.

Another lucky accident was Freud’s inability to hypnotize successfully and his consequent disparagement of hypnotism.

This delayed the general application of hypnotism to psychiatry for at least forty years.

But now psycho-analysis is being combined with hypnosis; and hypnosis has been made easy and indefinitely extensible through the use of barbiturates, which induce a hypnoid and suggestible state in even the most recalcitrant subjects.

Within the next generation I believe that the world’s rulers will discover that infant conditioning and narco-hypnosis are more efficient, as instruments of government, than clubs and prisons, and that the lust for power can be just as completely satisfied by suggesting people into loving their servitude as by flogging and kicking them into obedience.

In other words, I feel that the nightmare of Nineteen Eighty-Four is destined to modulate into the nightmare of a world having more resemblance to that which I imagined in Brave New World.

The change will be brought about as a result of a felt need for increased efficiency.

Meanwhile, of course, there may be a large scale biological and atomic war — in which case we shall have nightmares of other and scarcely imaginable kinds.

Thank you once again for the book.

Yours sincerely,

Aldous Huxley

"did you ever feel as though you had something inside you that was only waiting for you to give it a chance to come out? some sort of extra power that you aren’t using"
— aldous huxley (via warriorway)
robotcosmonaut:

Amusing Ourselves to Death

Aldous Huxley & George Orwell robotcosmonaut:

Amusing Ourselves to Death

Aldous Huxley & George Orwell

robotcosmonaut:

Amusing Ourselves to Death

Aldous Huxley & George Orwell

"Experience is not what happens to you; it’s what you do with what happens to you."
— Aldous Huxley (via lucifelle)
"There’s only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that’s your own self."

Aldous Huxley

(via your-maj3sty)
psychedelic-physicist:

“To be shaken out of the ruts of ordinary perception, to be shown for a few timeless hours the outer and the inner world, not as they appear to an animal obsessed with survival or to a human being obsessed with words and notions, but as they are apprehended, directly and unconditionally, by Mind at Large”  - Aldous Huxley”
“The Doors of Perception” is a 1954 book by Aldous Huxleydetailing his experiences when taking mescaline. The book takes the form of Huxley’s recollection of a mescaline trip that took place over the course of an afternoon, and takes its title from a phrase in William Blake’s poem The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. Huxley recalls the insights he experienced, which range from the “purely aesthetic” to “sacramental vision”. He also incorporates later reflections on the experience and its meaning for art and religion.”
Read The Doors of Perception online   
or 
Download the free e-book here

* A fantastic book. I highly recommend it to those who are interested in the consciousness and psychedelics.

psychedelic-physicist:

“To be shaken out of the ruts of ordinary perception, to be shown for a few timeless hours the outer and the inner world, not as they appear to an animal obsessed with survival or to a human being obsessed with words and notions, but as they are apprehended, directly and unconditionally, by Mind at Large”  - Aldous Huxley”


The Doors of Perception” is a 1954 book by Aldous Huxleydetailing his experiences when taking mescaline. The book takes the form of Huxley’s recollection of a mescaline trip that took place over the course of an afternoon, and takes its title from a phrase in William Blake’s poem The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. Huxley recalls the insights he experienced, which range from the “purely aesthetic” to “sacramental vision”. He also incorporates later reflections on the experience and its meaning for art and religion.”

Read The Doors of Perception online   

or 

Download the free e-book here

* A fantastic book. I highly recommend it to those who are interested in the consciousness and psychedelics.

(Source: imagineatoms)

"I want to know what passion is. I want to feel something strongly."
— Aldous Huxley, Brave New World (via larmoyante)

* Aldous Huxley

"“If we could sniff or swallow something that would, for five or six hours each day, abolish our solitude as individuals, atone us with our fellows in a glowing exaltation of affection and make life in all its aspects seem not only worth living, but divinely beautiful and significant, and if this heavenly, world-transfiguring drug were of such a kind that we could wake up next morning with a clear head and an undamaged constitution - then, it seems to me, all our problems (and not merely the one small problem of discovering a novel pleasure) would be wholly solved and earth would become paradise.”
ALDOUS HUXLEY
1894 - 1963"
— Aldous Huxley (via scorpiosays)
"The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be quite the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less sure, happier but less self-satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend."
— Aldous Huxley, The Doors of Perception 
"

Within the next generation I believe that the world’s rulers will discover that infant conditioning and narco-hypnosis are more efficient, as instruments of government, than clubs and prisons, and that the lust for power can be just as completely satisfied by suggesting people into loving their servitude as by flogging and kicking them into obedience. In other words, I feel that the nightmare of Nineteen Eighty-Four is destined to modulate into the nightmare of a world having more resemblance to that which I imagined in Brave New World. The change will be brought about as a result of a felt need for increased efficiency. Meanwhile, of course, there may be a large scale biological and atomic war — in which case we shall have nightmares of other and scarcely imaginable kinds.

Thank you once again for the book.

Yours sincerely,
Aldous Huxley

"
— Aldous Huxley, in a letter to George Orwell about Orwell’s novel, 1984 (via humanformat)

wespeakfortheearth:

laphamsquarterly:

Future fight!

world-shaker:

Orwell vs. Huxley

Both are geniuses, and both visions frightening. Worse yet, and as this inforgraphic points out, there’s much validity and reality to these dystopian nightmares. :(