CHOPZZ Website Hit Counter

sparklefucker:

So sad we live in the time where we can’t even turn to nature to get clean


I don’t want the future generations to blame us for the Great Pacific of Garbage which should be bigger than a state of Texas in the Pacific Ocean that’s floating around.Do ya? Okay, go eat your fucking sushi with the plastic then.

sparklefucker:

So sad we live in the time where we can’t even turn to nature to get clean

I don’t want the future generations to blame us for the Great Pacific of Garbage which should be bigger than a state of Texas in the Pacific Ocean that’s floating around.

Do ya? Okay, go eat your fucking sushi with the plastic then.

(Source: underthevastblueseas)

chztn:

Underwater Room - Manta Resort

The Underwater Room is a three-storey floating platform by Manta ResortThe bottommost part is submerged under water, whilst the upper roof functions as a place for stargazing and sunbathing.

griseus:

MARINE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CETACEANS

Currently very little is known about the impacts of marine renewable energy developments on whales, dolphins and porpoises.

The noise from the pile driving process (used in the majority of foundations) has the potential to cause the most harm to cetaceans, including physical injury. The sound of this industrial work can carry for many tens of kilometres under water. At distances of 30-40 kilometres, research has shown that the noise could be strong enough to mask the communication of harbour porpoises and bottlenose dolphins can also be affected behaviourally within this kind of distance.

Limited research that has been conducted so far has shown the potential for offshore wind farms to cause harbour porpoises to leave the area during construction. In some instances they did not later return to their usual numbers. Even where areas have been recolonised, it is not clear if these are the same animals returning or new animals moving into the area.

Other potentially negative impacts include noise both above and below the water, entrapment, entanglement or collision, pollution (e.g. leaks or spills of hydraulic fluid used in various devices, leaks of cargoes or fuel carried by the vessels such as maintenance vessels), changes in prey abundance and distribution.

These impacts are likely to be significantly greater – if placed in sensitive areas for cetaceans such as those used for breeding, nursing, feeding or migration.

These impacts are likely to be significantly greater – if placed in sensitive areas for cetaceans such as those used for breeding, nursing, feeding or migration.

(Source: miamivice88)

(Source: suck-myleftone)

(Source: natureblawggin)

nevver:

Underwater Waterfall

Approximately 1,200 miles off the southeast coast of Africa lies an island nation known as Mauritius nevver:

Underwater Waterfall

Approximately 1,200 miles off the southeast coast of Africa lies an island nation known as Mauritius nevver:

Underwater Waterfall

Approximately 1,200 miles off the southeast coast of Africa lies an island nation known as Mauritius

nevver:

Underwater Waterfall

Approximately 1,200 miles off the southeast coast of Africa lies an island nation known as Mauritius

ilaurens:

window to sunset - By: Angelo Daxer

(Source: ILAURENS)

jordanleeemerson:

apoplecticskeptic:

callurn:

acid-anarchism:

knowledgeandlove:

carlboygenius:

The Ocean Array Plan. Devised by 19yo Boyan Slat, this passive system, if installed, could clean up both The Great Pacific Garbage Patch & The North Atlantic Garbage Patch. Sort of like an anchored Roomba for the ocean…
Source: http://www.trueactivist.com/ingenious-19-year-old-develops-plan-to-clean-up-oceans-in-5-years/

"Although extensive feasibility studies are currently being conducted, it has been estimated that through the selling of plastic retrieved over the five years, the money would surpass the initial cost to execute the project. In other words, it may even be potentially profitable. Because the main deterrent to implement large scale cleanup projects is due to the financial cost, this solution could perhaps pave ways for future innovations of global cleanup to also be invented.”
This is huge.

I approve of this. Hopefully a system can be set up where all profits from this project go back into cleanup efforts

OCEAN ROOMBA

Ocean Roomba FTW.

Awesome!
jordanleeemerson:

apoplecticskeptic:

callurn:

acid-anarchism:

knowledgeandlove:

carlboygenius:

The Ocean Array Plan. Devised by 19yo Boyan Slat, this passive system, if installed, could clean up both The Great Pacific Garbage Patch & The North Atlantic Garbage Patch. Sort of like an anchored Roomba for the ocean…
Source: http://www.trueactivist.com/ingenious-19-year-old-develops-plan-to-clean-up-oceans-in-5-years/

"Although extensive feasibility studies are currently being conducted, it has been estimated that through the selling of plastic retrieved over the five years, the money would surpass the initial cost to execute the project. In other words, it may even be potentially profitable. Because the main deterrent to implement large scale cleanup projects is due to the financial cost, this solution could perhaps pave ways for future innovations of global cleanup to also be invented.”
This is huge.

I approve of this. Hopefully a system can be set up where all profits from this project go back into cleanup efforts

OCEAN ROOMBA

Ocean Roomba FTW.

Awesome!
jordanleeemerson:

apoplecticskeptic:

callurn:

acid-anarchism:

knowledgeandlove:

carlboygenius:

The Ocean Array Plan. Devised by 19yo Boyan Slat, this passive system, if installed, could clean up both The Great Pacific Garbage Patch & The North Atlantic Garbage Patch. Sort of like an anchored Roomba for the ocean…
Source: http://www.trueactivist.com/ingenious-19-year-old-develops-plan-to-clean-up-oceans-in-5-years/

"Although extensive feasibility studies are currently being conducted, it has been estimated that through the selling of plastic retrieved over the five years, the money would surpass the initial cost to execute the project. In other words, it may even be potentially profitable. Because the main deterrent to implement large scale cleanup projects is due to the financial cost, this solution could perhaps pave ways for future innovations of global cleanup to also be invented.”
This is huge.

I approve of this. Hopefully a system can be set up where all profits from this project go back into cleanup efforts

OCEAN ROOMBA

Ocean Roomba FTW.

Awesome!
jordanleeemerson:

apoplecticskeptic:

callurn:

acid-anarchism:

knowledgeandlove:

carlboygenius:

The Ocean Array Plan. Devised by 19yo Boyan Slat, this passive system, if installed, could clean up both The Great Pacific Garbage Patch & The North Atlantic Garbage Patch. Sort of like an anchored Roomba for the ocean…
Source: http://www.trueactivist.com/ingenious-19-year-old-develops-plan-to-clean-up-oceans-in-5-years/

"Although extensive feasibility studies are currently being conducted, it has been estimated that through the selling of plastic retrieved over the five years, the money would surpass the initial cost to execute the project. In other words, it may even be potentially profitable. Because the main deterrent to implement large scale cleanup projects is due to the financial cost, this solution could perhaps pave ways for future innovations of global cleanup to also be invented.”
This is huge.

I approve of this. Hopefully a system can be set up where all profits from this project go back into cleanup efforts

OCEAN ROOMBA

Ocean Roomba FTW.

Awesome!

jordanleeemerson:

apoplecticskeptic:

callurn:

acid-anarchism:

knowledgeandlove:

carlboygenius:

The Ocean Array Plan. Devised by 19yo Boyan Slat, this passive system, if installed, could clean up both The Great Pacific Garbage Patch & The North Atlantic Garbage Patch. Sort of like an anchored Roomba for the ocean…

Source: http://www.trueactivist.com/ingenious-19-year-old-develops-plan-to-clean-up-oceans-in-5-years/

"Although extensive feasibility studies are currently being conducted, it has been estimated that through the selling of plastic retrieved over the five years, the money would surpass the initial cost to execute the project. In other words, it may even be potentially profitable. Because the main deterrent to implement large scale cleanup projects is due to the financial cost, this solution could perhaps pave ways for future innovations of global cleanup to also be invented.”

This is huge.

I approve of this. Hopefully a system can be set up where all profits from this project go back into cleanup efforts

OCEAN ROOMBA

Ocean Roomba FTW.

Awesome!

The Island in Caribbean Sea.

(Source: palmandlaser)

  1. Camera: CanoScan LiDE 700F

thusreluctant:

Lifting Fog, Laguna by Guy Rose


high tide and low tide in great britain. photographs by michael marten

high tide and low tide in great britain. photographs by michael marten

high tide and low tide in great britain. photographs by michael marten

high tide and low tide in great britain. photographs by michael marten

high tide and low tide in great britain. photographs by michael marten

high tide and low tide in great britain. photographs by michael marten

high tide and low tide in great britain. photographs by michael marten

high tide and low tide in great britain. photographs by michael marten

(Source: R2--D2)

elige:

mohandasgandhi:

A Deadly Paradox: Scientists Discover the Agent Used in Gulf Spill Cleanup Is Destroying Marine Life (This is vile)

After the spill, BP secured about a third of the world’s supply of dispersants, namely Corexit 9500 and 9527, according to The New York Times. Of the two, 9527 is more toxic. Corexit dispersants emulsify oil into tiny beads, causing them to sink toward the bottom. Wave action and wind turbulence degrade the oil further, and evaporation concentrates the toxins in the oil-Corexit mixture, including dangerous compounds called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), known to cause cancer and developmental disorders.

BP says that Corexit is harmless to marine life, while the Environmental Protection Agency has waffled, saying both that “long term effects [of dispersants] on aquatic life are unknown” and that data “do not indicate any significant effects on aquatic life. Moreover, decreased size of the oil droplets is a good indication that, so far, the dispersant is effective.” 

But many scientists, such as Dr. William Sawyer, a Louisiana toxicologist, argue that Corexit can be deadly to people and sea creatures alike. “Corexit components are also known as deodorized kerosene,” Sawyer said in a written statement for the Gulf Oil Disaster Recovery Group, a legal consortium representing environmental groups and individuals affected by the Deepwater Horizon spill. “With respect to marine toxicity and potential human health risks, studies of kerosene exposures strongly indicate potential health risks to volunteers, workers, sea turtles, dolphins, breathing reptiles and all species which need to surface for air exchanges, as well as birds and all other mammals.” When Corexit mixes with and breaks down crude, it makes the oil far more “bioavailable” to plants and animals, critics allege, because it is more easily absorbed in its emulsified state.

Sawyer tested edible fish and shellfish from the Gulf for absorption of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC), believed to have been facilitated by Corexit. Tissue samples taken prior to the accident had no measurable PHC. But after the oil spill, Sawyer found tissue concentrations up to 10,000 parts per million, or 1 percent of the total. The study, he said, “shows that the absorption [of the oil] was enhanced by the Corexit.”

In April 2012, Louisiana State University’s Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences was finding lesions and grotesque deformities in sea life—including millions of shrimp with no eyes and crabs without eyes or claws—possibly linked to oil and dispersants.

The shocking story was ignored by major U.S. media, but covered in depth byAl Jazeera. BP said such deformities were “common” in aquatic life in the Gulf and caused by bacteria or parasites. But further studies point back to the spill.

A just-released study from the University of South Florida found that underwater plumes of BP oil, dispersed by Corexit, had produced a “massive die-off” of foraminifera, microscopic organisms at the base of the food chain. Other studies show that, as a result of oil and dispersants, plankton have either been killed or have absorbed PAHs before being consumed by other sea creatures.

[…]

EcoRigs divers took water and marine life samples at several locations in the months following the blowout. Now, they and countless other Gulf residents are sick, with symptomsresembling something from a sci-fi horror film, including bleeding from the nose, ears, breasts, and even anus. Others complain of cognitive damage, including what one man calls getting “stuck stupid,” when he temporarily cannot move or speak, but can still hear.

“If we are getting sick, then you know the marine life out in the Gulf is too,”Kolian said. The diver and researcher completed an affidavit on human and marine health used in GAP’s report.

Kolian’s team has done studies of their own to alarming results. “We recently submitted a paper showing levels of hydrocarbons in seafood were up to 3,000 times higher than safety thresholds for human consumption,” he said. “Concentrations in biota [i.e. all marine life] samples were even greater.”

(Continue reading…)


Recall the horrid symptoms other Gulf residents are experiencing and how BP has tried to downplay the toxicity of the dispersant used, Corexit, which is over 50 times more toxic than the oil itself when the two mix.


this is horrifying

(Source: mohandasgandhi)